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Rainwater Harvesting Systems in Mexico

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Rainwater Harvesting Systems in Mexico

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Area: 5888268 km2
Countries:
Brazil; Peru; Suriname; France; Colombia; Guyana; Bolivia; Venezuela; Ecuador
Cities:
Santa Cruz; Manaus; La Paz
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Quick Info

Countries: Mexico
Basins: Gulf of Mexico (458) (Rio Verde), North Pacific (455) (Rio Lerma - Guadalajara), Rio Grande
Project SDGs:
Includes Sustainable Development Goals from the project and its locations.
Increase Access to Water, Sanitation, Hygiene (SDG 6.1 & 6.2)
Project Tags:
Includes tags from the project and its locations.
Drought Management
Conservation Agriculture/Agronomy
COVID-19/Novel Coronavirus
Domestic Wastewater
Water Recycling and Reuse
Hygiene
Safe, Affordable Water
Nature-Based Solutions
Women & Water
Leaving No One Behind
Progress to Date: 3k people reached in Mexico as of June 2021 With funding, we can reach at least 1.5 million people with safe water by 2025.
Services Needed: Policy advocacy
Financial support
Desired Partners: Business
Financial Institution
Language: English
Start & End Dates: Oct. 01, 2021  »  Ongoing
Project Website: water.org/our-impact/where-we-work/mexico
Project Source: User
Profile Completion: 74%

Project Overview

The state of water and sanitation in MexicoT

• Half of Mexico's 120 million people do not have reliable access to safely managed drinking water or sanitation.
• Even for households that do have existing piped services, water quality remains low, with tap water not safe for drinking in many areas.
• Service reliability is a constant challenge, with water often flowing only a few times each week in many areas.
• Mexico is experiencing its worst drought in three decades, deplet…

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The state of water and sanitation in MexicoT

• Half of Mexico's 120 million people do not have reliable access to safely managed drinking water or sanitation.
• Even for households that do have existing piped services, water quality remains low, with tap water not safe for drinking in many areas.
• Service reliability is a constant challenge, with water often flowing only a few times each week in many areas.
• Mexico is experiencing its worst drought in three decades, depleting the main water sources for millions of families. In Guadalajara, the second largest metropolitan area in Mexico, 500,000 people have been without any water since March 2021.

Overview of the need

Mexico is currently experiencing its worst draught in three decades. Water access is a critical problem in parts of Mexico. Decreasing water resources and growing demand is resulting in the deterioration of water quality and quantity for vast, mainly low-income populations. About ten million people in Mexico now have no water services reaching their homes at all, with small, rural, and indigenous communities starkly overrepresented. In larger towns and cities, the trend is a widening gap between demand and supply, punctuated by increasingly frequent, acute episodes of extreme shortage.

The simultaneous water crises seen in Mexico City and Guadalajara this year are clear examples of this tendency, with Mexico City’s reservoirs at historic lows, and one of Guadalajara’s principal reservoirs falling to below-useable levels, which resulted in some 500,000 people there being left entirely without grid water for four months in the spring of 2021. These trends are driven by the deep depletion of underground and surface water resources and complicated by dysfunctional governance. They are likely to prove very difficult to reverse in the short term, and they are happening all over Mexico.

The result from this situation is the emergence of huge areas in which the population faces impoverished and decreasing access to water. Where decades ago, people expected to see urban public water services improve over time, they now line up for water from trucks, in neighborhoods that until recently had received their water from a tap. It is a slow-motion crisis that is leaving millions increasingly vulnerable and subject to being suddenly left without water.

Partner Organizations


We believe there's a smart way to end the global water crisis. Millions of people around the world could get access to safe water in their homes with the help of small, affordable loans. That's where we come in. Water.org … Learn More

Michael Mayernik
Primary Contact  

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